Teenage Cancer Trust was absolutely fantastic from the minute George walked into hospital to the minute he walked out. I think what best describes the environment they manage to achieve is that George thought it was home.

I applied for the London Marathon because I hate running! I wanted to put myself through something very hard because of what my son George went through. Back in December 2015 when he was 18, he’d been unwell for two to three weeks, which just wasn't like him, so we took him to Southend hospital. Within 24 hours we were sent to UCLH in London. On December 11th, my birthday, George was diagnosed with Leukaemia. 

Teenage Cancer Trust was absolutely fantastic from the minute George walked into hospital to the minute he walked out. I think what best describes the environment they manage to achieve is that George thought it was home. Through some of the very dark times George said "Dad, I want to go home" and what he meant was not our home but back to Teenage Cancer Trust. The facilities are just mind-blowing and as a parent I can't thank them enough. For George to deal with what he had to go through there, he’s very lucky. 

When I applied for my marathon place I was pretty much hoping I wouldn't be accepted but then I got the phone call and I was absolutely honoured and gobsmacked and a bit tearful, if I'm honest with you. The challenge was on! 

Training for the marathon has been a hard slog - I'm not a teenager, I'm 47! But I say I don't enjoy it when secretly I do! The markers of change since I started training is that I can eat what I like which is great, I am feeling a lot fitter and have a lot more energy. To motivate myself on tough days I think about George and and think about the reasons why I'm doing it and it puts it into perspective. 

On the day, I'm looking forward to finishing it!

Then I can honestly say that I've achieved something that I never ever thought I would be able to. I think at the start I'll be quite emotional, just taking everything in and thinking about the reason why I'm there. 

George is free of cancer now. He has his three monthly check-ups but he's back at work and leading a normal life. He will be there on the day and he’ll be at the finishing line. I'm hoping he’s going to be extremely proud of his dad running the London Marathon, knowing I couldn't run a 100 yards a few months ago!