“Running the London Marathon was just absolutely off the scale! The Teenage Cancer Trust cheering squads, every time you saw them, they were shouting, they were screaming for you!"

“I always thought it was going to be somebody else,” says Sean Kelly, thinking back to his son’s leukaemia diagnosis 9 years ago. “Our lives were thrown upside down, his life was thrown upside down, his sister's life thrown upside down.”

“He spent almost 6 months in St James' hospital in Leeds. As a parent, I was frustrated, I was upset, you're lots and lots of things. I used to go running just to get some of that frustration and upset out my body. Then my wife said 'well why don't you go off and do something and start raising some money?' so I entered a 10k and I suddenly found I had raised over £1,000 just doing a 10k.”

9 years on and Sean’s running has raised more than £20,000 for Teenage Cancer Trust. “Everybody that knows me, our network of friends and family, my colleagues, they all know that when you meet Sean it's always about raising money for Teenage Cancer Trust, it's something that's integral to me and my family now.”

Sean has run the London Marathon twice. “Running the London Marathon was just absolutely off the scale! The Teenage Cancer Trust cheering squads, every time you saw them, they were shouting, they were screaming for you! You were like ‘wow!’

The most exciting point for me was the camaraderie amongst the runners as we were all getting ready to start."

He doesn’t deny that training for a spring marathon through long cold winters is tough, but it doesn’t take much for him to pep up his own spirits: “When I'm having a down day I actually go back to one place and that's back to hospital. There's a lot of vivid memories, there's a lot of really, really sad memories for me, for the family, for Joe, with what he was going through and what we had to see. Then it's really, really, really easy to motivate myself, because whatever I'm going through is nothing compared to what he went through.

The answer to why he runs for Teenage Cancer Trust is easy: “When your son is ill the first thing that you realise is just how useless you are. Suddenly for the first time in their life you can't go and kiss it better, you can't put your arm around them and make the world better, you can't give them a piece of advice and as a parent it was absolutely destroying. Their support was absolutely phenomenal and it's a driver for me to try and put something back.”